Resource Library

Development

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Business Strategies to Empower African Women

Report | September 14, 2017

Charney Research, in conjunction with BSR (Business for Social Responsibility), conducted two phases of research, quantitative and qualitative, on working women in Ghana. We conducted focus groups, in-depth interviews, and…

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Women’s Economic Empowerment in Sub-Saharan Africa

By Charney Research & BSR | Report | March 23, 2017

According to the United Nations, gender inequality costs the region of sub-Saharan Africa an average of US$95 billion a year. Eliminating gender inequality and empowering women could raise the productive…

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Report finds fraud guarantees would accelerate adoption of mobile payments

Finextra.com | October 7, 2016

Concerns about fraud and theft risks are inhibiting adoption of mobile wallets, but businesses underestimate the problem, according to a new global survey of consumers and executives released today by…

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Measuring Corruption & Compliance: A Practical Toolkit

By Craig Charney | Press Clip | August 27, 2015 | 5 pages

Getting Solid Data on Corruption and Compliance: A Guide

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Measuring Corruption & Compliance: A Practical Toolkit

By Craig Charney | Press Clip | August 27, 2015 | 4 pages

In the developing world, everyone talks about corruption – but no one seems able to get a handle on it. Decision-makers in the corporate, development, and justice sectors concerned with combating…

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INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT: China’s New Open Door: The E-Commerce Boom

By Shehzad Qazi | Insights | Series II | No. 6 | September 2014

China is already the world’s largest retail market and its e-commerce is booming. E-tailers now command soaring sales, better pricing, and a stronger online presence compared to their brick-and-mortar cousins. Learn more about China’s retail of e-tailing in China in our exclusive report.

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INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT: Africa Roundup: Retailers Have Big Opportunities – But Female Farmers Face Big Problems

By Craig Charney | Insights | Series II | No. 4 | June 2014

A recent report highlights important news from Africa: burgeoning (and unexpected) opportunities for the retail sector as the continent’s growth takes off. Another spotlights an important problem holding Africa back: the continuing gender gap confronting women in African agriculture.

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DEVELOPMENT: The Development Evaluation Blogosphere

By Craig Charney | Insights | Series II | No. 2 | January 2014

When Charney’s Development Evaluation Survey for the Society for International Development-Washington was released last month, one of the surprises was how little use people concerned with development evaluation seemed to get out of the blogosphere. This article offers a rundown of blogs specializing in development evaluation that can be of great use to development evaluation professionals. They offer ways to keep up with developments in field, at important development institutions, or in particular methods.

SIDW/Charney Survey: The State of Development Evaluation

By Craig Charney | Report | December 17, 2013 | 41 pages

What’s happening in development evaluation? How often do development projects include evaluation — and what kinds? How are evaluators chosen? How big are their budgets? How satisfactory are their results?…

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Indonesia Update

By Craig Charney, Wayne Forrest, and Mary Natalegama | Transcript | January 31, 2008 | 19 pages

This Council of Foreign Relations (CFR) panel on Indonesia discusses the impact of the death of Indonesia’s longtime dictator Suharto. Polling clearly spoke to the consolidation of democracy. Charney underlined the progress the country has made, the contribution of U.S. democracy assistance, and the challenges ahead.

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Afghan Human Development Report

Report | January 1, 2007 | 198 pages

This report outlines the economic growth and social development in Afghanistan from 2004 to 2007, and the challenges facing continuous development. For Afghans, human development means government institutions and a society that educates its young, offers medical services to all, facilitates sustainable livelihoods, and ensures peace in a manner consistent with Island.

Corruption & Compliance

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Measuring Corruption & Compliance: A Practical Toolkit

By Craig Charney | Press Clip | August 27, 2015 | 5 pages

Getting Solid Data on Corruption and Compliance: A Guide

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Measuring Corruption & Compliance: A Practical Toolkit

By Craig Charney | Press Clip | August 27, 2015 | 4 pages

In the developing world, everyone talks about corruption – but no one seems able to get a handle on it. Decision-makers in the corporate, development, and justice sectors concerned with combating…

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Corruption in China: What Companies Need to Know

By Craig Charney & Shehzad Qazi | Press Clip | January 21, 2015 | 4 pages

How can companies learn about the realities of the risk of official corruption in China? It is common knowledge that firms often find themselves obliged to make payments or give…

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New Data: Bribery is often “An Unspoken Rule” in China

By Jeff Levick | Forbes | January 21, 2015 | 2 pages

Until now, corporate compliance and risk management officers often confronted the same problem when seeking to strengthen or establish effective anticorruption controls. The data they had to work with was…

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Democracy - Civil Society

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The Real Winner in Afghanistan’s Election

By Craig Charney and James Stavridis | Insights | Series II | No. 5 | July 2014

 We don’t know yet who will prevail in Afghanistan’s approaching presidential runoff, but we already know the big winner — the Afghan people. The big loser, of course, is the…

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INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT: RESEARCHER’S DIARY – HOW DO YOU TEACH MALIAN WOMEN TO RUN FOCUS GROUPS?

By Andrea Levy | Insights | Series II | No. 5 | July 2014

OK, I’m feeling a bit intimidated. The women in front of me are stone-faced and look completely aloof. Will they like me? Am I going to bore them? A day…

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After the Arab Spring: Democratic Consolidation in Tunisia’s Elections?

By Craig Charney | Insights | Series II | No. 3 | February 2014

This article discusses the possibilities for Tunisia to establish meaningful electoral competition and the alternation of power as its second democratic election approaches. While the country has made important democratic advances since President Zine el Abedine ben Ali fell in December 2010, the country still faces many challenges moving forward.

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Mandela’s South Africa: Why Democracy Won

By Craig Charney | Insights | Series II | No. 1 | December 2013

This April 1994 New York Times op-ed argued that the social movements, common identities, and shared values of South Africans boded well for the nascent post-Apartheid South African democracy. With the recent passing of Nelson Mandela, we are reminded not only of his importance, but also the importance of all South Africans, who overcame anger and fear to establish their Rainbow Nation.

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Understanding the Arab Spring: Public Opinion and the Roots of Revolution in the Arab World

Powerpoint Presentation | January 26, 2012 | 36 pages

This discussion with Craig Charney sponsored by the Center for Strategic and International Studies examines what is distinctive about the five Arab Springs as well as why the Gulf States remain free of change, and other issues related to the revolution in the Arab world, including the distinguishing economic and political factors, the common political and economic elements, and new media. It also assesses the post-revolutionary conditions, post-revolutionary elections, religious institutions and identity, and international issues. The results of several national opinion polls show that upheavals occurred where the fewest were thriving, countries with more poverty had more unrest, and stability prevailed where the most were.

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Egypt, the Beginning or the End?

By Thomas Friedman | The New York Times | December 6, 2011 | 3 pages

The fact that the Muslim Brotherhood and the even more fundamentalist Salafist Nour Party have garnered some 65 percent of the votes in the first round of Egypt’s free parliamentary elections since the ouster of President Hosni Mubarak should hardly come as a surprise. Given the way that the military regimes in the Arab world decimated all independent secular political parties over the last 50 years, there is little chance of any Arab country going from Mubarak to Jefferson without going through some Khomeini. But whether this is the end of the Egyptian democracy rebellion, just a phase in it or an inevitable religious political expression that will have to coexist with the military and secular reform agendas remains to be seen. This New York Times article discusses the results of the post-revolution national election in Egypt.

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Afghan Civil Society Assessment

Report | December 1, 2011 | 80 pages

This report offers an evaluation of the progress made by Afghan Civil Society organizations since 2005 by drawing on key informant and focus group interviews. It assesses the impact of the USAID-funded Initiative to Promote Afghan Civil Society (IPACS) on organizations that have participated in the program.

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Egypt Since the Revolution

Report | November 1, 2011 | 17 pages

This report prepared for a presentation for the Egypt Roundtable at the Brookings Institute is based on a poll conducted by Charney Research for the International Peace Institute consisting of a random national sample of interviews with 800 Egyptian adults and discusses the current mood in post-revolution Egypt with regards to the economy, basic order and security, the national government, and relations with the West. As the economic situation has darkened, Egyptians have grown anxious and are looking for help from the state. Egyptians now say they were worse off financially and less secure than under former president Mubarak, while displeasure with the national government has jumped to levels seen under Mubarak while Prime Minister Sharaf’s favorability has plunged.

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Shifts in Egyptian Public Opinion

By Ed Husain | CFR | October 11, 2011 | 2 pages

This article written for the Council on Foreign Relations discusses the results of a poll conducted by Charney Research measuring public opinion in post-revolution Egypt. The great belief that the Egyptian military does not kill its own was shattered this weekend as the army crushed a Christian protest in Cairo. Coptic Christians that wanted answers about the lack of support for new churches and the government’s failure to investigate previous attacks on Christians were answered with military bullets. Egypt is a country in transition with an increasingly impatient population.

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IPI Egypt Poll: Concern Rising About Revolution, Economy, and Security

Report | September 20, 2011 | 2 pages

This International Peace Institute (IPI) announcement discusses the results of a poll conducted by Charney Research for IPI that shows that while Egyptians remain cautiously optimistic, concern grows with regards to the economy and stability. Egyptians now say they are worse off economically and feel less secure than under former president Mubarak. In these circumstances, the majority say the country’s ongoing protests are unnecessary disruptions.

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Obama Versus Osama: Guess Who the Egyptians Prefer?

By Colum Lynch | Foreign Policy | June 21, 2011 | 2 pages

While the U.S. President Barack Obama is more than twice as popular in Egypt as Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadenijad, the American president’s standing has never been worse in Egypt, plummeting since 2008, when he received a 25 percent favorability rating, to 12 percent in 2011. Even Osama Bin Laden, the late al Qaeda leader, was more popular this year, with a 21 percent favorability ranking. The Iranian leader fared worse, dropping from 21 percent favorability rating in 2008 to a miserable 5 percent. This article for Foreign Policy discusses the results of a Charney Research poll measuring support for various foreign and domestic politicians and political candidates.

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Egypt: Towards Democratic Elections

Powerpoint Presentation | June 1, 2011 | 18 pages

This report based on a survey conducted by Charney Research for the International Peace Institute (IPI) assesses Egyptians’ attitudes regarding the upcoming elections and the various issues facing the country. Egyptians’ mood remains optimistic, but less as economic and security concerns have increased, with vote intention high across Egypt.

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Egyptians Back Diplomat in Poll, Show Secular Bent

By Jay Solomon | International Peace Institute | April 7, 2011 | 2 pages

Egypt’s Former Foreign Minister Amr Moussa—a vocal critic of some U.S. foreign policy—leads the field among likely presidential candidates, with the secular Wafd Party emerging as the most popular political group, according to a poll by a United Nations-affiliated think tank. The poll also concluded that most Egyptians don’t seek any radical changes in their government’s foreign relations, including with Israel, or its path of economic liberalization. The poll, conducted by Charney Research for the New York-based International Peace Institute (IPI) for the upcoming Egyptian national elections, found Egypt’s largest Islamist organization, the Muslim Brotherhood, ranks second in popularity among political parties.

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Pakistan: Public Opinion Trends and Strategic Implications

Report | December 1, 2010 | 20 pages

This report based on scientific, national, randomly-sampled opinion surveys assesses Pakistani attitudes towards the direction the country is headed in and the various issues that Pakistan faces

Rise of the Rest III: Climate Change, Energy, and Global Governance after the Financial Crisis

By Craig Charney , Nikolas K. Gvosdev , Parag Khanna , Stephen B. Young , David C. Speedie , and Devin T. Stewart | Audio | March 9, 2010 | 26 pages

This panel discussion addressed the changed brought by financial crisis in areas such as security, economics, governance, and environment. The crisis of global governance, in the form of power, norms, and institutions, has become a serious issue after the financial crisis.

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A Democratic Indonesian Tiger

By James Castle and Craig Charney | The Washington Post | August 1, 2007 | 2 pages

This Washington Post article discusses Indonesia’s comeback following the Asian financial crisis of 1997. The country has witnessed a collapsing economy, fleeing dictators and the establishment of democracy in the interval years. See what polling says about the country’s now and future.

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Hearts and Minds: Afghan Opinion on the Taliban, Government, and International Forces

Report | August 1, 2007 | 6 pages

This brief from a discussion of a panel of experts at a meeting of the United States Institute of Peace’s Afghanistan Working Group discusses current trends in public opinion in Afghanistan with regards to the performance of the Afghan government and the Taliban resurgence. Since the election of new leaders and the establishment of a new constitution, the government of Afghanistan has been trying to prove its legitimacy and ability to foster stability, security, and the rule of law. The Taliban resurgence is playing a major role in public perception of the government’s competence and the role of the international forces. Understanding these current trends in public opinion can aid in tailoring the international intervention to ensure that prior progress is not lost and that elements corroding the strength of the state are diminished.

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Misunderstanding Afghanistan

By Craig Charney and Gary Langer | The Washington Post | December 17, 2006 | 2 pages

This Washington Post article discusses misconceptions within the West with regards to the conditions in Afghanistan. The full picture of Afghanistan’s rugged terrain is much more complex: While active, the Taliban lacks popular support. Though Karzai’s honeymoon is over, he retains majority backing. The Afghan state is relatively weak, but it is present—and popular, in most of the country. Unlike Iraq, Afghanistan is a country where the populace favors the U.S. and allied military presence.

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Strife Erodes Afghan Optimism Five Years After the Taliban’s Fall

Report | January 1, 2006 | 27 pages

This report of a survey conducted by Charney Research for ABC News/BBC World Services discuses the various reasons why optimism has declined within Afghanistan five years after the fall of the Taliban.

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Despite Deep Challenges in Daily Life, Afghans Express a Positive Outlook

Report | December 7, 2005 | 4 pages

This article of a survey conducted for ABC News by Charney Research of New York with field work by the Afghan Center for Social and Opinion Research in Kabul finds that four years after the fall of the Taliban, Afghans express both vast support for the changes that have shaken their country and remarkable optimism for the future, despite the deep challenges they face in economic opportunity, security and basic services alike.

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Indonesia’s Elections: Nation Builders at Work 

By Craig Charney and Tim Meisburger | The Straits Times | October 14, 2004 | 3 pages

This article for The Straits Times discusses the success of U.S. funded voter education efforts in Indonesia. They strengthened Indonesia’s fledgling democracy in the past two elections. Nation-building works can make a difference with supportive partners and a sympathetic public.

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Afghan Success Story 

By Craig Charney | The Washington Post | July 30, 2004 | 2 pages

This Washington Post article discusses Charney Research’s survey results that gauged the interest of Afghan citizens in upcoming elections. Charney’s survey showed that nearly three years after U.S. troops launched the war on terrorism in Afghanistan to drive out the Taliban and Osama bin Laden, Afghans want democracy. Though big problems — public ignorance, administrative and partisan difficulties, and insecurity — must be faced if the elections are to succeed, the research indicates democracy’s chances in Afghanistan may be better than widely thought.

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Optimism in Afghanistan

By Ryan Sager | New York Post | July 27, 2004 | 2 pages

This New York Post article discusses the results of the first-ever public opinion poll conducted in Afghanistan by Charney Research showing that people there are optimistic about the future and excited about upcoming elections. Afghanistan has a constitution, is registering voters and is moving toward holding a presidential election in October.

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Voter Education Planning Survey: Afghanistan 2004 National Elections

Report | July 1, 2004 | 124 pages

This report for the Asia Foundation based on a public opinion poll consisting of a random, representative sample of 804 in-person interviews offers detailed, quantified information on the knowledge and attitudes of Afghan citizens regarding their country’s September 2004 national elections. The mood is positive in most of the country, with Afghans identifying the major problems facing their country as its weak economy, the security situation, a poor education system, and shattered infrastructure. Nonetheless, a large majority is pleased with the Transitional Government and President Karzai’s job performance.

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Ask the Afghans, And they’ll tell you they’re looking forward to their first free elections.

By Craig Charney | The Weekly Standard | May 17, 2004 | 5 pages

This article discusses the results of a poll consisting of in-depth, open-ended interviews intended to offer a window on the views of the Afghan electorate. While unease has grown in Kabul with the Taliban and its allies increasing their pressure, something different and important has been happening in the provinces, much less reported. Many Afghans have come to feel hopeful about their country and look forward to its first free elections, planned for September.

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Voices of Afghanistan: Afghans Speak about Their Country, Elections, Gender, and Democracy

Report | March 1, 2004 | 76 pages

This report for the Asia Foundation based on 32 in-depth interviews offers an assessment of what typical Afghan voters think about various issues related to the upcoming elections and possible voter education campaigns. The Afghans interviewed are optimistic about their country’s future because the beginnings of peace, normality, and reconstruction outweigh their disappointment over continuing problems of insecurity, warlordism, and poverty.

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Afghanistan: Bullets vs. Ballots

By Craig Charney | New York Post | December 4, 2003 | 2 pages

This New York Post article describes terrorist activities in Kabul with the reappearance of the Taliban in the country’s southeast, and the changing tactics being deployed to prevent the continuance of a resurgent enemy as Afghans are determined to rebuild their country, working with foreign help.

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Democracy in Cambodia – 2003: A Survey of the Cambodian Electorate

Report | May 16, 2003 | 103 pages

This report for the Asia Foundation based on survey research consisting of a random, representative sample of 1,008 in-person interviews provides detailed information on the knowledge and attitudes of Cambodian voters. The survey also provides measures of the progress of democratization in Cambodia and the impact of voter education projects.

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Indonesia: A Report on Public Opinion and the 2004 Elections

Report | February 1, 2003 | 19 pages

This report for the Asia Foundation based on survey research consisting of 30 in-depth interviews and 3 focus groups assesses Indonesian attitudes with regards to elections and democracy. It finds that the national mood is rather pessimistic, with the public discontented with the direction of the country and the work of the government, and the country’s key problems understood to be the economy, justice and corruption. Although some of the public know new elections are coming, and most know voters will have to re-register to participate, few know of direct Presidential elections.

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Democracy in Indonesia: A Survey of the Indonesian Electorate

Report | January 1, 2003 | 274 pages

This report for the Asia Foundation based on survey research consisting of a random nationally representative sample of 1056 in person interviews assesses voter knowledge and opinion, and identifies key issues and challenges facing election administrators and assistance providers in advance of the 2004 national elections. It covers the national mood, political participation, voter and civic education needs, gender, civil justice, media use and campaign recommendations, etc.

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Voter and Civic Education Needs for the 2003 Cambodian National Assembly Elections

Report | January 1, 2003 | 26 pages

This report for the Asia Foundation based on 15 in-depth interviews offers an assessment of attitudes towards the July 2003 national elections in Cambodia and the development of democracy there more generally. The survey results indicate some progress in the consolidation of democracy in Cambodia over the past three years, although they also show that the country still needs assistance in voter education and other areas before it can be considered a fully functioning democracy.

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East Timor Lorosa-e National Survey of Citizen Knowledge

Report | January 1, 2002 | 80 pages

This comprehensive survey consisting of 1558 in-person interviews was commissioned by the Asia Foundation with the goal of evaluating voter education programs to date and laying the groundwork for planning future civic education efforts. This report raises critical issues related to the national mood; voter and civic education issues; access to media; language use and preference; and demographics. It provides recommendations on each of these critical issues to increase voter knowledge and future civic participation.

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Indonesia: Citizens Have Poor Grasp of Democracy

By Vaudine England | South China Morning Post | March 16, 1999 | 2 pages

Only three per cent of Indonesians see any connection between democracy and elections but nearly everyone intends to vote in the country’s June poll. Indonesians also feel cautiously optimistic about their country’s direction and future despite their concerns about the economy, according to the first nationwide survey of Indonesians’ views. This article for the South China Morning Post discusses the results of a Charney Research survey that assesses Indonesian citizens’ opinions about the direction the country is heading in as well as upcoming national elections.

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Indonesia National Voter Education Follow Up Survey

Report | February 1, 1999 | 347 pages

This report for the Asia Foundation based on survey research consisting of a randomly-drawn national sample of 1,008 in-person interviews assesses the impact of the voter education campaign before the June 1999 election. The basic conclusion of the survey is the election and the voter education campaigns conducted by The Asia Foundation, USAID, and other organizations succeeded, with the election being far more legitimate than voting was under President Suharto and few complaints of electoral abuses.

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Indonesia National Voter Education Survey

Report | February 1, 1999 | 347 pages

This report for the Asia Foundation based on survey research consisting of 2,593 randomly-selected in-person interviews assesses the information needs of Indonesian voters leading up to the June 1999 election. The national findings examine the national mood, attitudes towards elections, registration campaign needs, voter education needs, civic education needs, and voter education sources and media.

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Public Opinion in Kazakhstan

Report | April 1, 1997 | 139 pages

This report for the International Foundation for Election Systems (IFES) based on a country-wide opinion survey analyzes the public opinion environment in Kazakhstan regarding the views of the public on political and economic development, the performance of government, and civic and political organizations. The results of the survey show that the public is discontented with conditions in the country; fairly favorable toward a market economy and economic reform, and strongly attached to private property; supportive of democratic rights, but increasingly dissatisfied with the performance of government institutions; and favorable to multi-party democracy, but not to the existing parties.

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Black South Africans Defy Prophets of Doom

By Michael Hill | The Baltimore Sun | February 12, 1995 | 4 pages

This article offers a discussion of a study about political expectations of South Africa’s black population. A systemic study has found a politically sophisticated population that understands the limitations of government instead of a country that is full of unrealistic expectations.

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Voices of a New Democracy – CPS Focus Group Report

Report | November 1, 1994 | 83 pages

This report documents African expectations in the new South Africa, following the nation’s transition to majority rule. The findings of the project, though relatively small-scale, reveal in-depth assessments of urban and rural opinions. Overall sentiments show realistic yet hopeful expectations with a desire for a political culture of inclusion.

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South Africa: Campaign and Election Report

Report | October 1, 1994 | 285 pages

This report outlines the political environment in South Africa soon after South Africa’s first nonracial election and discusses the ways in which this election tested all typical transitional political and administrative challenges to the limit. The election was a historic first step achievement towards liberation and a nonracial society, and although it reflected the will of the majority of South Africans, the final numerical results of the election did not accurately represent the precise number of votes cast for each party.

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Democracy Won

By Craig Charney | The New York Times | April 27, 1994 | 3 pages

This article discusses the potential implications of South Africa’s first multi-racial elections. Who will win this election, more importantly, what will that mean for the country. It seems democracy has already gained the first point.

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Economic Growth & Entrepreneurship

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Business Strategies to Empower African Women

Report | September 14, 2017

Charney Research, in conjunction with BSR (Business for Social Responsibility), conducted two phases of research, quantitative and qualitative, on working women in Ghana. We conducted focus groups, in-depth interviews, and…

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Women’s Economic Empowerment in Sub-Saharan Africa

By Charney Research & BSR | Report | March 23, 2017

According to the United Nations, gender inequality costs the region of sub-Saharan Africa an average of US$95 billion a year. Eliminating gender inequality and empowering women could raise the productive…

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Report finds fraud guarantees would accelerate adoption of mobile payments

Finextra.com | October 7, 2016

Concerns about fraud and theft risks are inhibiting adoption of mobile wallets, but businesses underestimate the problem, according to a new global survey of consumers and executives released today by…

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China Beige Book Says Pessimism ‘Thoroughly Divorced From Facts’

By Craig Charney and Leland Miller | Bloomberg | September 21, 2015

  China’s economy isn’t as weak as it may look, according to a private survey from a New York-based research group that says it’s a myth the nation’s slowdown is intensifying….

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Don’t Bet on More Chinese Stimulus

By Leland R. Miller and Craig Charney | The Wall Street Journal | October 22, 2014 | 2 pages

As long as the labor market and profits remain healthy, Beijing shouldn’t and likely won’t try goosing the economy in the near future. It took years for the markets to…

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INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT: China’s New Open Door: The E-Commerce Boom

By Shehzad Qazi | Insights | Series II | No. 6 | September 2014

China is already the world’s largest retail market and its e-commerce is booming. E-tailers now command soaring sales, better pricing, and a stronger online presence compared to their brick-and-mortar cousins. Learn more about China’s retail of e-tailing in China in our exclusive report.

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China Beige Book Shows Economy Stuck in Low Gear

Bloomberg | September 22, 2014

China’s economy remained stuck in “low gear” this quarter, with struggling retail and residential real-estate industries countering improvements in manufacturing and transportation, a private survey showed. Growth in investment slowed…

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This China Slowdown Is Different

By Leland R. Miller and Craig Charney | The Wall Street Journal | July 14, 2014

In a recent Wall Street Journal article, China Beige Book authors Leland Miller and Craig Charney assert that Chinese capital expenditure is the weakest it has been in over a decade and may indicate a continued investment downshift that will be difficult to reverse. This slowdown is not merely a result of artificially-constrained investments but also a slowdown in demand and consumption.

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Survey Suggests China May Finally Be Getting the Message on Debt

By Richard Silk | The Wall Street Journal | June 23, 2014

Only 19% of companies reported accessing credit during the second quarter of the year, down from 30% a year ago, according to the China Beige Book, a private-sector polling organization. That’s despite a drop in the average interest rate on new loans. Analysts’ concerns that China’s economy relies too much on debt may turn out to be true.

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INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT: Africa Roundup: Retailers Have Big Opportunities – But Female Farmers Face Big Problems

By Craig Charney | Insights | Series II | No. 4 | June 2014

A recent report highlights important news from Africa: burgeoning (and unexpected) opportunities for the retail sector as the continent’s growth takes off. Another spotlights an important problem holding Africa back: the continuing gender gap confronting women in African agriculture.

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China Beige Book Says Economy Slowing

Bloomberg | March 20, 2014

This article discusses the results of the China Beige Book Survey (CBB) for the 1st quarter of 2014 and notes that China’s economy slowed in quarter 1, adding to the signs that Chinese Premier Li Keqiang may face difficulties reaching a 7.5% growth expansion target for 2104 without stimulus.

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China’s Economy Continues to Improve on Manufacturing

The Wall Street Journal | December 26, 2013

China’s stronger manufacturing and real estate sectors indicate a recovery, but there are some concerns on whether this is sustainable. The rise in inventory at manufacturing and mining firms is an issue. Major regional differences in retail growth were also discovered.

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THE MISREADING OF CHINA’S GROWTH DATA

By Leland R. Miller and Craig Charney | The Wall Street Journal | October 24, 2013

Even if not technically inaccurate, Beijing’s GDP numbers mislead investors into a misguided optimism over an economy slowing down. China Beige Book’s survey, contrary to official data, finds a mild growth slowdown. This divergence in growth stories reveals critical information before the Third Plenum economic conference.

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THE CHINESE CASH CRUNCH IS NO SURPRISE

By Leland R. Miller and Craig Charney | The Wall Street Journal | June 13, 2013

For three consecutive quarters, firms have been borrowing less and paying higher rates in China. This is another signal that China has endured an overall tightening in credit this year. Investors should be careful in reading China’s official data, which pictures a rather rosy scenario.

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Retailers, Inland Regions Drive China Economy in Q1 – Beige Book Survey

Reuters | March 27, 2013 | 3 pages

This Reuters article discusses the findings and data collection methodology of the China Beige Book (CBB).CBB reports strong revenue growth in the retail sector among signs of incoming uncertainties. Its respondents cover businesses of every size from the micro-level – employing up to 19 staff – to large firms with more than 500 employees.

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Iraqi Business Barometer Slide Presentation

Powerpoint Presentation | July 1, 2011 | 24 pages

The study aimed to identify Iraqi business attitudes toward the current business environment, challenges to business development, confidence in government efforts to assist business, and the role of business associations and Chambers of Commerce. It finds that Iraqi businesses are optimistic about the current and future economic environment, and that businesses would like increased financial support and improved basic services but that corruption is the top impediment to growth.

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Iraqi Business Attitudes on the Economy, Government, and Business Organizations

Report | January 1, 2011 | 50 pages

This report, based on a business survey conducted by Charney Research for the Center for International Private Enterprise (CIPE) consisting of 900 interviews among formal and informal businesses in Iraq, discusses Iraqi business views on the economy, government, and business organizations. This survey demonstrates that Iraqi businesses are generally optimistic about their business prospects over the next several years. It is imperative to analyze current obstacles adversely affecting the growth of the business sector in Iraq—corruption, weak infrastructure, lack of regulatory enforcement, and difficulty in obtaining loans—and to assist the business community in communicating their needs to the government.

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Afghan Business Attitudes on the Economy, Government, and Business Organizations

Report | January 1, 2010 | 38 pages

The development of a thriving, dynamic, and resilient commercial sector in Afghanistan is crucial to maintain political stability in the country and achieve long-term security from both internal and external threats. This report, based on survey research, offers insights into attitudes of Afghan businesses with regards to their own and other community prospects.

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Indonesian Attitudes 10 Years After Crisis 

By James Castle and Todd Callahan | The Jakarta Post | May 21, 2007 | 3 pages

This article from the Jakarta Post discusses the results of a Charney Research poll that assesses Indonesian attitudes with regards to various issues the country faces 10 years after the Asian economic crisis. Findings on Indonesian’s minds considerably contrast with the results 10 year ago. Most Indonesians believe their country is on the right path.

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Indonesian Outlook Survey

Report | January 1, 2007 | 104 pages

This survey explores Indonesians’ attitudes towards public affairs and business. Among the topics examined were: views on the state of the country, President Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono and other political figures, voting intentions for the 2009 elections, the economy, consumer purchasing intentions, business, policy issues affecting business and major firms, development organizations, corruption, security, terrorism, anti-Americanism, and trade boycotts.

A New Point of Departure on the Bond Boycotts

By Craig Charney | Business Day | December 14, 1995

This article argues that a policy to restore townships’ housing and service payments must begin by recognizing that non-payment is no longer the result of collective action, so it cannot be addressed solely by collective solutions. It will also require policies to encourage individual responsibility and to change individual calculations on the costs and benefits of paying.

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Gender

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Business Strategies to Empower African Women

Report | September 14, 2017

Charney Research, in conjunction with BSR (Business for Social Responsibility), conducted two phases of research, quantitative and qualitative, on working women in Ghana. We conducted focus groups, in-depth interviews, and…

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Women’s Economic Empowerment in Sub-Saharan Africa

By Charney Research & BSR | Report | March 23, 2017

According to the United Nations, gender inequality costs the region of sub-Saharan Africa an average of US$95 billion a year. Eliminating gender inequality and empowering women could raise the productive…

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There’s Grounds for Hope in Afghanistan

By Craig Charney and Isobel Coleman | CFR.org | June 18, 2007 | 3 pages

This article for The Globe and Mail discusses the reasons to be hopeful with regards to the potential for positive changes in Afghanistan: Afghans themselves are changing their society, with Afghan women playing a leading role. Despite the Taliban’s military revival, Afghan women have won broad support for their rights to study, work, and vote, largely gained since the Taliban’s 2001 ouster, and overwhelmingly reject their former oppressors. But, at the same time, Afghans are struggling to reconcile many of their Islamic traditions with the modern world, as the case of women also shows.

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Democracy in Indonesia: A Survey of the Indonesian Electorate

Report | January 1, 2003 | 274 pages

This report for the Asia Foundation based on survey research consisting of a random nationally representative sample of 1056 in person interviews assesses voter knowledge and opinion, and identifies key issues and challenges facing election administrators and assistance providers in advance of the 2004 national elections. It covers the national mood, political participation, voter and civic education needs, gender, civil justice, media use and campaign recommendations, etc.

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A Woman’s Place

By Poll Watcher and Orna Coussin | Haaretz | June 17, 1998 | 2 pages

Incipient signs of disparities in voting patterns between men and women in Israel have been found in a survey conducted by an American polling expert Craig Charney. In Israel, he says, such issues are only beginning to penetrate the public consciousness, and the country is still well behind Britain, France and the United States on this score. His current survey in Israel yields two conclusions: first, women in Israel are definitely an “interest group,” and second, candidates seeking election would do well to appeal to that group if they want to go far.

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Empowering Israeli Women

Report | June 1, 1998 | 99 pages

The aim of this study is to explore how women in Israel can increase their political power as a group and advance issues important to them as women. The result is that there has been little to no “gender gap” between the voting behavior of men and women in Israel and scant recognition of women as an interest group. Even research on women’s political attitudes in Israel has been rare, and there has never been a comprehensive national survey on the subject until now.

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